Say No to Shark Fin | WWF

Say No to Shark Fin

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You too can play a part in keeping our marine ecosystems healthy
© naturepl.com / Doug Perrine / WWF

Sharks in the Seas. Not in the Soup.

Sharks are harvested worldwide, sometimes for their meat, but more often for the lucrative fin trade centred in Asia. Many shark species are overfished, pushing them to the brink of extinction. Whether you are an individual consumer, company or restaurant owner, you can help save the sharks by stopping consumption or sale of shark fin.
Up to 73 million sharks are killed to satisfy our enormous demand every year. As a result, an increasing number of shark species has been threatened. In 1996 only 15 shark and related species were considered threatened. This has soared by 12 times in over a decade and by 2010 over 180 species were considered threatened, being listed either on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, or the Appendices of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

Sharks are particularly vulnerable to over-exploitation because they are slow-growing, mature at a late age, and have relatively low productivity. This means that their populations are slow to recover once overfished.

The high market demand for shark fin is currently the main driver of unsustainable fishing for sharks globally. Shark fin soup has been a tradition at Chinese festive celebrations and wedding banquets. But growing demand of shark fin soup is pushing our sharks to extinction. 

As a top predator in the food chain, sharks feed on fishes which in turn feed on smaller fishes or plankton. When sharks become extinct, this irreversible change will cause populations of other fishes to go unchecked, exhausting the supply at the start of the food chain. Soon, fish stocks that are essential to our survival will be depleted.

Singapore is one of the largest shark fin trading nations. Unfortunately, there is only one small sustainable shark fishery in global terms, and the development of sustainable fisheries for sharks is likely to be far too slow to effectively conserve shark populations in most parts of the world.
 
	© Rendy Aryanto / WWF Singapore
© Rendy Aryanto / WWF Singapore
Hosting a shark fin-free banquet?
Calling all banquet hosts! Our new No Fin banquet cards let you share the conservation message to your guests. If you want to use the cards at your banquet, call 6730 8100 to make arrangements to pick them up from our office! Click on the image to see the full card and text.

Special thanks to Fuse Creative Singapore for the concept and design.
 
	© Cat HOLLOWAY
Silky shark caught by the fin on an illegal longline hook.
© Cat HOLLOWAY
Shoppers looking at dried marine products like shark fins and dried abalone in Sheung Wan District, ... 
	© Jürgen Freund / WWF
Say No to Shark Fin
© Jürgen Freund / WWF